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Upgraded to Mojave - almost painless

Having been nagged for months with notifications to upgrade to Mojave I finally took the plunge. It wasn't really a plunge, as I considered with release 10.14.3 most of the initial problems would have been ironed out. Also, I spent quite a lot of time preparing to migrate.


I reviewed all 32 bit apps on my iMac and cleared out some little-used stuff, while transferring some other apps that I use occasionally to my 2009 MacBook Pro running El Capitan. I checked all the remaining apps for updates. I cleaned out a lot of files using Disk Doctor Pro, finding in the process a cache of over 8GB associated with my Tom Tom Connect app. Finally I did a First Aid scan with Disk Utility.


The install went without a hitch. I selected dark mode but while it looked great on my 4k iMac screen, it wasn't very good on my now ageing Apple Cinema second screen. So I reverted to light mode. I had to give my Avira Anti-Virus access to the computer, the Avira app prompting this after the upgrade and guiding me through it. Some other apps needed permission to access files, which was simply a matter of agreeing when the pop-up message appeared.



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Promoting a Facebook page

I recently self-published my book French at 60, which was an education in both the effort of writing it and the complexity of then publishing. The next stage was to sell it, which I now realise is going to perhaps be the hardest part of the process.


As a first step I created a business page on my Facebook account and decided to take a ten-day promotion, which cost me £20, equivalent to selling about ten books based on my royalty payments. I wasn't overly hopeful but it seemed quite an easy thing to set up. I chose an audience based on the subject, language learning, adding France as another key word and targeting an older demographic, which again fitted with the intended audience. The promise was audience reach and 'Likes', which was no doubt achieved judging by the summary of the promotion. But viewing and liking is easy, whereas meaningful engagement is not so easily achieved. From the summary below you will see that engagement was minimal. I shouldn't be surprised since Facebook is, at the end of the day, a network of fleeting engagements without real depth. It's all about 'Likes'.


And as for book sales, well you won't be surprised to learn that it appears to have driven a nice round zero!


Facebook promo



Back to Vinyl

Quite a few years ago I bought an inexpensive Bush record deck with the intention of transferring my old vinyl collection to CD. It turned out to be a labour of love with many technical problems. The Windows' software didn't always play ball and the process was of course carried out in real time, making it particularly laborious. When I learned that 'burned' CDs could deteriorate over time, that was the signal not to bother. The deck was relegated to a corner of my study.


Bush record deck

For 2019 I decided to make room for the deck on my desk. As my last stand-alone amplifier was retired a long time ago, I fed the output into my little Sony Micro HiFi system, which is connected to a couple of circa 50 year-old Goodmans' Mezzo 3 speakers. As I write this I'm listening to Gershwin's Greatest Hits on CBS records dated 1971. Quite nostalgic hearing a record I bought so long ago, which even allowing for the budget setup, and my ageing ears, sounds so crisp compared to the ubiquitous compressed music formats that we have to endure today.


However, whether I will invest in the vinyl offerings on sale today remains to be seen, some of which seem a bit pricey.



The trials and tribulations of self-publishing

Kindle Direct Publishing - the paperback story

I have written a book. It took me a while, and over the past few weeks I have been negotiating Amazon's Kindle Direct Publishing system to get my book to market. Amazon seemed the best place to go, given its reach in the marketplace and the maturity of the publishing framework. There is copious advice on all stages of the process, which in the case of a printed book requires a properly configured Word or PDF file. You also need a cover and back cover, for which you can choose from templates or design your own. I did the latter, using an outline template to ensure correct positioning of all the elements. Fiddly but achievable in my Photoshop Elements application.



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High Sierra clean install - a bit of a problem!

I wanted to pass on an iMac to my daughter and decided to perform a clean install of High Sierra. The iMac was running Sierra so I first updated it to High Sierra. I was under the impression that a restore copy of this would at the same time be saved to the hard disk, from which I could reinstall after reformatting the main disc partition. But after I had erased the disk, when I tried to reinstall from the recovery option I received the message that the recovery server could not be contacted.


Some online research suggested that I needed to open Terminal and reset the date, which if incorrect can apparently result in a loss of synchronism with the Apple servers. Unfortunately in previously exploring one of the menu options I had seemingly exited Utilities. I did a Cmd-R restart, expecting to reboot into Utilities, but instead a small spinning globe symbol appeared in the centre of the screen with the option to select a WiFi connection and recover over the internet. This done, a download bar gradually progressed and in time I was presented with the install screen for Mavericks, the OS that was on the iMac when we got it.


At least I had the option to install something. Once Mavericks was up and running I once again updated to High Sierra, but the whole thing took a lot longer than I had expected. And I was a bit disappointed that despite following Apple's guidelines I had ended up with the server error. Installing High Sierra twice certainly was an unwelcome frustration.


Apple replaced my iPhone 6s battery - for free!

For quite a while now my iPhone 6s has been shutting down despite the battery meter registering over 30%. I had assumed it was a calibration error on the meter but when the phone recently shut down with over 40% charge remaining, I decided it was time to search the internet to see if this was a known problem. I discovered that there had in fact been a small number of iPhone 6s devices manufactured in 2015 that had faulty batteries, and mine was one of them. This was established by entering and submitting the serial number to Apple.


iPhone unexpected shutdown issues


I chose to go to my nearest Apple Shop in Cambridge (UK) but when I selected this option on the web page, it offered an appointment the following day with no option to change it. This wasn't convenient, so I phoned the store. After negotiating the automated menu, I think I ended up with a central technical department, not the store. Having explained the issue, the technician ran a remote analytics on the phone and confirmed a battery fault. He made an appointment for me to visit the store at 15.00 on the following Saturday.


The store was frenetic, deluged with people wanting the new iPhone X. I had arrived 20 minutes before the appointment and was told to come back 5 minutes before. It seems that the appointment system is very precise, although not being prepared to take the phone a bit earlier seemed somewhat pedantic. Anyway, I returned at the suggested time and the job was 'set up', after the in-store technician had re-run the analytics and confirmed the battery fault. Just under two hours later I returned to collect my phone with its new battery, free of charge.


The overall process was a bit bureaucratic but with a bit of patience I got there in the end, and hope now to enjoy a few more years service from my iPhone 6s.


Secure the web - My sites are go!

We are being encouraged to ensure that sites have an SSL Certificate, designated by the https:// web address. Most browsers now show if a site is secure and one imagines that the time will come when non secure sites become unacceptable. Fortunately, my web hosting company, justhostme.co.uk, provides basic SSL certification for all registered domains.


I manage a site for my daughter, which I've just completely updated, while at the same time making sure it was secure, and I have a relatively new site that I created to accompany a book I'm writing, which I again built with security in mind. The main issues arose in respect of this site, kilburnlad.net, which was built a while ago, without considering the security issue.


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Traffic Announcements (TA) glitch sorted

My Merc SLC will be two years old in September and since I took delivery the traffic announcements have refused to appear. Much playing around with settings in the information system produced no results and a software update at the first service didn't help either. The weird thing was that if selected to a local radio station, then the announcements from that station appeared, which was of little use of course, as you would hear them anyway while listening to the station. But with national stations, nothing, other than a slight dip in the sound when we thought one was trying to cut in.


More in hope than expectation, at the two-year service a week or so ago I again mentioned the problem. On that day the software updating system wasn't working, apparently, but today we returned and left the car for a couple of hours to have the system updated. Of course, the only way of checking if the update achieved anything is to await a traffic announcement, so when we collected the car we didn't know if the problem had been resolved. But, encouragingly, when I plugged in my iPhone to Car Play, I had to negotiate a number of pages of agreement terms that required acceptance, confirming that at least something significant had changed.


We were almost home, a journey approaching an hour, and no announcements had appeared. Beginning to fear yet another failure, much to our surprise Radio Cambridge traffic popped up.

Bingo, problem sorted.


TAStock image


My 'Kilburnlad in Retirement' blog has closed

In 2008, when I retired, I started a blog on the Blogger platform. It was to be a record of what I got up to with my new-found freedom. At one point it became very eclectic but over time it ended up being almost entirely dedicated to film reviews. In October 2016 I decided to stop posting to it, and I migrated the film reviews to this site, where my fishing diary had moved previously, and where my more recent golf diary is based. Put simply, kilburnlad.net was to become my web presence.


I left the Blogger site frozen at October 2016 but did set up some feeds from this site, namely this blog, the fishing diary and the film reviews. I was reluctant to delete the Retirement blog as it contained some nostalgic posts, and so things have remained. But the time has now come to say goodbye to what is now a little-viewed blog. To ease my 'loss' I researched the possibility of archiving the content. Blogger allows you to download a backup in the form of an XML file, but in its raw form it's quite intractable. I looked to see if there was any way to open the file in a viewable form, but drew a blank. But there were other options.


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Tesco mail service closing - nightmare!

I've had a Tesco email account for what seems forever, and I use it for all my online registrations and many other contacts. So when I received a message that the service is to close on 27 June this year my heart sunk. I have subsequently spent many hours going through all my login items in my password manager, visiting the sites concerned, and changing the contact email.


Tesco mail closing


What I found amazing was the difference in trying to achieve this on the various sites. From simply just changing the address, to needing to phone up and organise it verbally (John Lewis!). In between these extremes there were various shades of complexity, from the fairly common need to verify the new address after setting it up, through to needing to add a new address and then delete the original, changing the 'primary' address in the process, or needing to send an email requesting the change. In some cases just finding where on the site you needed to navigate to was a challenge in itself.


While doing all this I was prompted for a Flash update one site, and with my attention distracted by the main job in hand, I fell for a malware download very convincingly masquerading as Flash. This infected all my browsers and rather than trying to clean the files out, I opted to revert the whole computer back a few hours using Time Machine. This cleaned things up, but it took a good couple of hours, and I think I might have lost some archived emails as I tried to work out which of the hundreds of 'Recovered Files' in Mail were indeed recovered, and which were just duplicates of what I already had. I also had to backtrack through the password items I had already updated in my password manager, changing again the login email address. My Apple ID brought with it further complications as the various devices prompted for the Apple password, while still quoting the Tesco email address even though I had changed it. Things have finally settled down but I had to play around a bit to get all my local files back into the iBook application, eventually enabling iCloud storage for iBook to synchronise all devices.


All the password related items are now done, with many deleted as I carried out a bit of housekeeping as I went through the list. Now I need to deal with mailing list items where there are no sign in requirements, and finally all the personal contacts to whom I've given the address over the years. A laborious and very unrewarding exercise that I could well have done without.


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